Measles

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Basics

Description

  • Vaccine preventable, primarily childhood, infectious disease characterized by fever, cough, coryza, conjunctivitis, and erythematous maculopapular rash
  • Also known as rubeola
  • Incidence is low in the U.S. due to widespread immunization
  • Death occurs in 1–3/1,000 cases in the U.S.
  • Still common in many parts of the world and travelers bring the disease to the U.S.

Etiology

  • Rubeola is a morbillivirus, a single-stranded enveloped RNA virus with 1 serotype, in the paramyxovirus family
  • Humans are the only known reservoir
  • Highly contagious. Respiratory isolation should be initiated when suspected. Outbreaks seen in nonimmunized or underimmunized

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Basics

Description

  • Vaccine preventable, primarily childhood, infectious disease characterized by fever, cough, coryza, conjunctivitis, and erythematous maculopapular rash
  • Also known as rubeola
  • Incidence is low in the U.S. due to widespread immunization
  • Death occurs in 1–3/1,000 cases in the U.S.
  • Still common in many parts of the world and travelers bring the disease to the U.S.

Etiology

  • Rubeola is a morbillivirus, a single-stranded enveloped RNA virus with 1 serotype, in the paramyxovirus family
  • Humans are the only known reservoir
  • Highly contagious. Respiratory isolation should be initiated when suspected. Outbreaks seen in nonimmunized or underimmunized

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